North West Hunt Saboteurs

Canadian GeeseHow You Can Help Stop The Canadian Geese Cull

At the start of 2004 information was received that Severn Trent Water planned to cull Canadian geese around the Ladybower, Derwent, and Howden reservoirs on the A57 between Manchester and Sheffield. (It is not known at the present time whether they are planning any similar culls at Carsington Water near Ashbourne).

It is understood that the National Trust had put pressure on Severn Trent Water after complaining about the geese. As with many other similar situations involving wildlife one species is culled in the 'so-called' interest of another.

The only way to prevent the cull taking place this year was to oil the eggs to prevent them hatching out, and this was carried out by animal welfare volunteers. This process involved coating the newly laid eggs with liquid paraffin which blocks the pores in the egg shell, depriving the fertilised egg of oxygen.

Regulation of Canadian geese numbers is not necessary. Scientific studies show that geese droppings are not a threat to human health.

Please contact Severn Trent Water and the National Trust (see addresses below), stating that you are outraged about the proposed cull at Derwent and ask Severn Trent for assurances that they will not be proposing any future culls on any of their land.

Also If you are a shareholder or member of any of the two organisations involved, please tell them that you are considering selling your shares or withdrawing your membership.

Severn Trent Water plc
2297 Coventry Road
Birmingham
B26 3PU
Tel: 0121 722 4000
customer.relations@severntrent.co.uk

The National Trust
33 Sheep Street
Cirencester
GL71RQ
Tel: 0870 609 5382 enquiries@thenationaltrust.org.uk

Information on Canadian Geese

On arrival in spring, yearlings from the previous year will leave their parents and join other yearlings from other families, sometimes quite a distance away. They do not mate and nest until about three years old and are unlikely to nest successfully the first time.

During late summer, when adult geese moult, they are unable to fly for about one month. This is when they are cruelly culled.

Canadian geese and other indigenous species are under threat as a result of the burdens placed upon them by human population growth. Yet, certain 'experts' insist on displacing the responsibility and pretending that ecological harmony can be restored through the barrel of a gun. (Information from www.canadageese.org)

We hope you enjoy your visit, but please remember the wildlife especially, when you go near the waters edge and at nesting times in particular.

The above text was supplied by Sheffield and Manchester animal welfare groups


Contact us

info@nwhsa.org.uk

Tel: 07960 038230

For all the latest news check our blog

We are also on Facebook and Twitter

We are now also on Facebook

We are now also on Twitter